SGT News and Announcements

New LIMS Ordering Website Launches May 6

Sequencing and Genomic Technologies is rolling out our new LIMS ordering website SeqLIMS on May 6, 2024.

New features will simplify ordering, billing, and communications. All new project request should be made on SeqLIMS starting May 6.

Current quotes and orders will continue to be managed on DUGSIM until completion.

Visit SeqLIMS

 

IT Infrastructure Update

The Sequencing and Genomic Technologies is undergoing an update to our IT infrastructure to support the larger datasets produced by the Illumina X Plus and PacBio Revio.

There have been some bugs that have affected data delivery of all sequencers. We are working diligently to resolve the IT issues.
 
There may be delays in data delivery in the next few weeks. We appreciate your understanding and your support of SGT.

Sarah Clarke embarks on a new journey

Sarah Clarke has served as a lab research analyst in the Sequencing and Genomic Technologies (SGT) core facility since 2020. In January, she will be transitioning to a new position at the NC State Vector-Borne Disease Lab. She received her undergraduate degree in natural resource ecology from the University of Vermont in 2020.

How did you arrive at this position at Duke?

Holiday Hours & Closures

The Sequencing and Genomic Technologies Core Facility will be closed and will not be accepting samples on the following dates:

  • November 23 - 24
  • December 22 - January 2

Sequencing Core launches Illumina X Plus sequencer

The Sequencing and Genomics Technologies Core Facility is running orders for the Illumina NovaSeq X Plus.

The X Plus provides high quality short read sequences for a fraction of the cost of the Illumina NovaSeq 6000. Additionally custom read-length projects can now purchase lanes instead of full flow cells (e.g. 75 SR for miRNA-seq, single cell protocols).

The available products are listed below, with more read options available towards the end of the year.

Product

SGT gives tour of Chesterfield on Halloween

Devi Swain Lenz “expressed herself” as Madonna during a new faculty tour of the Sequencing and Genomic Technologies Core facility on Halloween. They explored the Chesterfield Building, home to Duke's long-read sequencing for examining genome regions and short-read sequencers vital for cancer research.

Devi Swain Lenz showing a chip for a sequencer