2021 DMAA Awardees

2021 DMAA Awardees

Both our 2021 and 2020 Duke Medical Alumni Association Awardees will be celebrated during the spring of 2022.

About the Awardees >

 

Davison Building with Medical Alumni Weekend Logo

Medical Alumni Weekend 2021

Classes celebrating a reunion in 2021 include those ending in 6 or 1 (’71, ’76, ’81, ’86, ’91, ’96, '01), the Half Century Society (classes of ’37 through ’70), and Young Alumni (classes of ’06 through ’21).

View Recorded Reunion Events >

School & Alumni News


 

School Launches Plan to Dismantle Racism

Since launching its Moments to Movement initiative in June 2020, Duke University School of Medicine has begun work to better understand the root causes and harms of racism and to develop strategies to reduce racial inequity.

Alumni Spotlight: Emily Wang, MD’03

Emily Wang, MD’03, spent her first two years at Duke University School of Medicine planning to specialize in HIV treatment and research. But during her third year, she couldn’t stop thinking about conversations she had had with a friend who had worked in prison education while an undergraduate at Harvard.

Zhao Zhang, PhD: Follow the Jumping Genes

Zhao Zhang, PhD — ZZ to just about everyone — is a bit of a scientific outlier. While most of his bioscience colleagues around the world are studying the 23,000 protein-coding genes that make us human, the assistant professor of pharmacology and cancer biology is looking at the other part of the genome and asking what it does.

Alumni Spotlight: Susan Blackwell, MHS, PA-C’89

In a lot of ways, Susan Blackwell (Crawford), MHS, PA-C’89, and the physician assistant profession have grown up together. They were born at roughly the same time, matured in parallel and proximity, and for more than three decades they’ve been inextricably linked.

Josh Huang, PhD: Shining a Light on the Traffic Signals in the Brain

Think of the inner circuitry of the brain as a traffic network. When nerve cells release a signal, the information speeds along various routes to its destination: another nerve cell elsewhere in the brain. Neurobiologist Josh Huang, PhD, is especially interested in a particular type of inhibitory nerve cells called chandelier cells.

Helping Kids Cope

The stress and isolation of the pandemic may have a lasting toll on some children, but Duke experts say most will recover fully — and some might even emerge with new strengths.

Carolyn Coyne, PhD: Exploring How Viruses Evade the Placental Barrier

The human placenta performs a delicate balancing act: it must let beneficial nutrients pass from the mother to the developing fetus, but block harmful pathogens from making the same trip. Carolyn Coyne, PhD, investigates how the placenta has evolved to be such a fantastic protector but can also be vulnerable to pathogens.

Using Genetic ‘Dimmer Switches’ to Combat COVID-19

Nick Heaton, PhD, is interested in the little things. Microscopic, in fact. The assistant professor of molecular genetics and microbiology joined Duke in 2015 to investigate RNA respiratory viruses, primarily influenza.