Graduate Student Course Information

 

2018 Fall Master Course Listing

2018 Spring Master Course Listing

2017 Fall Course Master Listing

2017 Spring Course Master Listing

2016 Fall Course Master Listing

2016 Spring Courses Master Listing

2015 Spring Courses Master Listing

2015 Fall Courses Master Listing


Additional Non-Departmental Courses of Interest
 

The Career Center has created a guide to many courses in the Business School (Fuqua), the School of Public Policy (Sanford), and the Law School that welcome our students. Check it out to learn more about your options.

 

Duke Extend offers free, online courses that you can take at your own pace in a small number of specialized topics. Check them out to see if any is right for you!

Coursera for Duke allows Duke students, staff, and faculty to take any of Duke’s online Coursera courses and earn a verified certificate for free. Coursera for Duke is a platform specifically for the Duke community to access courses on topics ranging from computer programming to writing, all taught by Duke faculty.

The below courses are open to all SOM PhD students, but may require special permission of the instructor or may give enrollment preferences to students from certain schools at Duke. If you are hoping to use these courses specifically to satisfy programmatic/departmental requirements, please check with your DGS and/or advisor prior to enrolling.


(Summer 2018)

Duke Summer Doctoral Academy is a two-week program of short courses designed to introduce doctoral students to skills, tools, and knowledge that augment their regular coursework and help them prepare for dissertation research, innovative teaching, leadership, and/or public engagement. The courses are free for enrolled students. Mini-courses on academic storytelling, media communication, and project management may be of particular interest!

Each course meets for three hours a day for five consecutive days. Monday, May 21 – Friday, May 25, 2018 or Tuesday, May 29 – Saturday, June 2, 2018

 

The High Throughput Sequencing Course offered by Duke's Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics is an intensive, six-week, multi-disciplinary course covering the biological,  statistical, computational and informatics knowledge for implementing a well-designed genomics experiment, with RNA Sequencing as a central focus. Central components of the course are hands-on library preparation and data analysis. The course is scheduled 07/05/2018-08/9/2018 (9:00-11:45and and - 1:45-4pm). This course is funded through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative, which fully covers tuition for all course participants, as well as on-campus room-and-board for a limited number of participants. Advanced undergraduates, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows are welcome to apply. We also welcome high-school teachers or undergraduate STEM faculty. Any questions can be sent to the course email address: htscourse@duke.edu.


(Spring 2018)
 
Bioethic 702: This course, offered through the Duke Initiative for Science & Society, provides students in STEM disciplines with practical training in the communication of scientific research to non-scientists, and helps them develop skills essential to doing meaningful outreach. Meets Tuesdays from 3:05-4:55 PM. For more information, contact course instructor Jory Weintraub.

GS 805: Writing in the Natural Sciences. The Graduate School, in collaboration with the Thompson Writing Program, offers a 1-credit course in academic writing support for Ph.D. students engaged in research projects. The seminar course addresses genres of scientific research writing, structure and function of research reports, grant proposals, introductions and literature reviews, and presenting results, among other topics. The course earns 2 RCR credits. Priority is for advanced PhD students in the natural sciences with specific research writing projects/needs. For a permission number, Ph.D. students should contact the instructor, Dr. Cary Moskovitz, with a brief description of their research writing project. (Tuesdays, 3:05-4:20)

I&E 590: Hacking for Conservation & Development:  Applying a Lean Startup Model to the World’s Greatest Challenges 
This course focuses on teaching principals and practice of next generation approaches for conservation and development, with a problem-oriented approach.  The course will review how we may harness the power of exponential technologies, open innovation, and entrepreneurship to transform the efficacy and scale of conservation & development efforts. This course will also offer participants a boot camp in rapid iteration, value proposition formulation and testing, frugal design, principals of digital development, open innovation, and technology development and scaling, as applied to solving wicked problems. Interdisciplinary project teams will review the current problem sets in conservation and development, and take a scientific approach to developing, evaluating, and iterating innovations through evidence collection and hypothesis testing.
Alex Dehgan, PhD Chanler Innovator; Friday 12:00pm – 2:30pm | Location: Gross Hall 105 (Permission Required Contact: alexdehgan@gmail.com)
 
I&E 710: Research and Technology Translation
This course focuses primarily on the innovative and entrepreneurial aspects of translating research and technology developments out of the lab and research center and launching new products or starting new companies. The dark reality is that most ventures fail. Sometimes there is not much you can do to prevent failure; however, you can reduce the chance of failure by learning from others’ experience and your own experience. This course leverages the experiences of others who have failed and succeeded so you can increase your chances of success. This course will cover many topics typically taught in technical leadership programs and graduate professional programs. You can think of it as “The Art of Start and the Science of Triumph!” Salman Azhar, PhD; Tuesday 6:15pm – 8:45pm | Location: Gross Hall 105
 
I&E 720: Biodesign
The Biodesign course is an experiential program composed of two main sections. Each section requires extensive team interaction and the direct application of skills in the finding and solving of problems identified by those going through the class. The first section focuses on the need and is composed of 4 modules – the team, needs finding, needs ranking, and need description/specification. The second section focuses on the solution and is composed of 3 modules – brainstorm, mind map, and solution development/pitch. Joseph A. Knight, PhD, MBA; Wednesday 5:45pm – 8:15pm | Location: Gross Hall 105
 


(Fall 2017)

Research and Technology Translation (I&E 710) Tu 6:15PM - 8:45PM | Salman Azhar, PhD
This course focuses primarily on the innovative and entrepreneurship aspects of translating research and technology developments out of the lab and research center, as well as launching new products or starting new companies. The dark reality is that most ventures fail. Sometimes there is not much you can do to prevent failure; however, you can reduce the chance of failure by learning from others’ experience and your own experience. This course leverages the experiences of others who have failed and succeeded so you can increase your chances of success. This course will cover many topics typically taught in technical leadership programs and graduate professional programs. You can think of it as “The Art of Start and the Science of Triumph!” 

Biodesign (I&E 720) W 5:45PM - 8:15PM | Joseph Knight, PhD, MBA
The Biodesign course is an experiential program with a focus on learning a proven, project-based approach to identifying health needs and developing innovative diagnostics, devices, or other health technologies to address them. The course is divided into two sections and each section requires extensive team interaction and the direct application of skills in the finding and solving of problems identified by those going through the class. The first section focuses on the need and is composed of four modules – the team, needs finding, needs ranking, and need description/specification. The second section focuses on the solution and is composed of three modules – brainstorm, mind map, and solution development/pitch. 


(Summer 2017)
High-Throughput Sequencing Course (Non-credit)
Wed, July 5 through Thurs, Aug 10

Genomics technologies are advancing at an exponential rate, and the ability to run genomic experiments and analyze the resulting data is a critical skill set for future researchers in biology and medicine. Due to the complexity of the genome and the vast quantities of data generated per experiment, making sense of genomic data poses unique statistical and computational challenges. As part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Initiative, the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, together with faculty from the Duke Center for Genomic and Computational Biology, has been funded to host a 6-week summer course from July 5 -August 10 2017 on High Throughput Sequencing (HTS). Our goal is to teach the next generation of scientists the biological, statistical, computational and informatics knowledge for implementing a well-designed genomics experiment. This is a full-time course, and lectures/labs will be conducted from 9 - 4 PM from Mondays to Thursdays. Fridays and weekends are free for coursework, group projects and social activities.

Admissions are rolling - application instructions can be found here.


(Spring 2017)
​BIOETHIC 702: Science Communication for Scientists by Jory Weintraub, PhD and Karl Bates

This course provides students in the sciences with practical training in the communication of scientific research to non-scientists, and helps them develop skills essential to doing meaningful outreach. Topics covered include the empirical benefits of communicating science; development of speaking, writing, and storytelling practices for diverse audiences; answering difficult, controversial, and critical questions from the media; and tweeting, blogging, and presenting research to engage non-scientists (including the lay public and policy-makers). Tuesday 3:05pm - 4:55pm | Location: North Bldg, Room 232. Contact Jory Weintraub (jory@duke.edu) with any questions.

I&E 590: Social Innovation Practicum by Paul Bloom, PhD, MBA and Matt Nash, MBA
In the Social Innovation Practicum, students will learn about and support the design, development, assessment, and scaling up of innovative, sustainable approaches to addressing critical social and environmental problems in Durham and around the world. Working in multidisciplinary teams, students will gather and analyze data, develop recommendations, formulate implementation plans, and provide other support to clients that may include social entrepreneurs, funders, public sector innovators and policy makers, corporate social impact managers, and others. Participating students will have increased capacity for effective and thoughtful entrepreneurial leadership throughout their careers. Tuesday 6:15pm - 8:45pm | Location: The Bullpen - 215 Morris St., Suite 300, Durham, NC 27701

I&E 710: Research and Technology Translation by Salman Azhar, PhD
This course focuses primarily on the innovative and entrepreneurship aspects of translating research and technology developments out of the lab and research center and launching new products or starting new companies. The dark reality is that most ventures fail. Sometimes there is not much you can do to prevent failure; however, you can reduce the chance of failure by learning from others' experience and your own experience. This course leverages the experiences of others who have failed and succeeded so you can increase your chances of success. This course will cover many topics typically taught in technical leadership programs and graduate professional programs. You can think of it as "The Art of Start and the Science of Triumph!" Tuesday 10:05am - 12:35pm | Location: The Bullpen - 215 Morris St., Suite 300, Durham, NC 27701
 
I&E 720: Biodesign by Joseph A. Knight, PhD, MBA and Nandan Lad, MD, PhD
The Biodesign course is an experiential program composed of two main sections. Each section requires extensive team interaction and the direct application of skills in the finding and solving of problems identified by those going through the class. The first section focuses on the need and is composed of 4 modules - the team, needs finding, needs ranking, and need description/specification. The second section focuses on the solution and is composed of 3 modules - brainstorm, mind map, and solution development/pitch. Wednesday 5:45pm - 8:15pm | Location: The Bullpen - 215 Morris St., Suite 300, Durham, NC 27701
 


(Fall 2016)
​Bioethic 502: Communicating Science & Bioethics by Jory Weintraub, PhD

This course examines the challenges of and best practices for communicating scientific and bioethical issues to the public, journalists, and policymakers. The course will explore the historical and cultural factors that influence public understanding of and attitudes toward scientific and bioethical issues. Students will draw on communication case studies from a variety of disciplines (genetics, neuroscience, law, bioethics) and their own academic interests as a context for developing writing and speaking skills essential for clear communication of complex topics to non-specialists. Geared towards graduate students and advanced undergraduate students. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.

Bioethic 501S: Science and the Media: Narrative Writing about Science, Health and Policy by Misha Angrist, PhD
Those who write about science, health and related policy must make complex, nuanced ideas understandable to the nonscientist in ways that are engaging and entertaining, even if the topic is far outside the reader's frame of reference. Course examines different modes of science writing, the demands of each and considers different outlets for publication and their editorial parameters. Students interview practitioners of the craft. Written assignments include annotations of readings and original narratives about science and scientists. Course considers ways in which narrative writing can inform and affect policy. Prerequisites: a 200-level science course and/or permission of the instructor.

Law 333: Science Law & Policy  by Michael B. Waitzkin, JD, LLM

What are the government policies that support science? How is science regulated and controlled? What can science contribute to law and policy? How do the states, the federal government and international agencies interact to set science policy? How do disparate regulations and law impact research and translation? How is scientific research funded? These questions and more will be explored by looking at the interaction of law, science, and policy. The class is a mix of law, ethics and science students, and learning how to talk to one another in a common language is an important element of the course. Classes will include consideration and analysis of cases studies. There are no prerequisites for the course, and there is no requirement that students have either graduate or upper-level undergraduate training in the sciences. Course evaluation will be based on class participation, student presentation, weekly discussion questions, a short paper, and a final exam.

Revised 5 April 2018