Bruce Klitzman

Bruce Klitzman
Associate Professor of Surgery
Third Year Mentor - Biomedical Engineering and Surgery Study Program (BES)
Third Year Mentor - Cardiovascular Study Program (CVS)
Third Year Mentor - Clinical Research Study Program (CRSP)
Campus mail: 479 & 487 Medical Sciences Research Building 1, 203 Research Dr, Durham, NC 27710
Phone: (919) 684-3929

Our overriding interests are in the fields of tissue engineering, wound healing, biosensors, and long term improvement of medical device implantation. My basic research interests are in the area of physiological mechanisms of optimizing substrate transport to tissue. This broad topic covers studies on a whole animal, whole organ, hemorheological, microvascular, cellular, ultrastructural, and molecular level. The current projects include:
1) control of blood flow and flow distribution in the microcirculation,
2) the effects of long-term synthetic and biologic implants on substrate transport to tissues,
3) tissue engineering; combining isolated cells, especially adult stem cells, with biomaterials to form specialized composite structures for implantation, with particular emphasis on endothelial cell physiology and its alteration by isolation and seeding on biomaterials.
4) decreasing the thrombogenicity of synthetic blood vessels and other blood-contacting devices, and improving their overall performance and biocompatibility.
5) reducing tissue damage resulting from abnormal perfusion (e.g., relative ischemia, anoxia, etc.) and therapies which minimize ischemic damage.
6) biosensor function, particularly glucose sensors in normal and diabetics.
7) measurement of tissue blood flow and oxygenation as an indicator of tissue viability and functional potential.
8) development of biocompatible materials for soft tissue reconstruction or augmentation.
9) improving performance of glaucoma drainage devices by directing a more favorable foreign body reaction
10) wound healing; particularly internal healing around foreign materials and the effect and prevention of microbes around implanted devices.

Education and Training

  • University of Virginia, Ph.D. 1979

Publications

A clinical model of dermal wound angiogenesis.

Full-thickness dermal biopsies were performed in healthy volunteers to establish the range of angiogenic responses in wound healing in a normal population. Four-millimeter punch biopsies were made in the forearms of 15 healthy volunteers.

A medical-toxicological view of tattooing.

Long perceived as a form of exotic self-expression in some social fringe groups, tattoos have left their maverick image behind and become mainstream, particularly for young people.

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