Cohen-Wolkowiez, Fecci, and Herman Elected Members of American Society for Clinical Investigation

Thursday, April 29, 2021
Michael Cohen-Wolkowiez, MD, PhD, Peter Edward Fecci, MD, PhD, and Mark A. Herman, MD

Michael Cohen-Wolkowiez, MD, PhD; Peter Edward Fecci, MD, PhD; and Mark A. Herman, MD

Three School of Medicine faculty members-- Michael Cohen-Wolkowiez, MD, PhD, Peter Edward Fecci, MD, PhD, and Mark A. Herman, MD—were inducted into the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) at an April joint meeting of ASCI, the Association of American Physicians (AAP), and the American Physician-Scientists Association (APSA). Founded in 1908, the ASCI is one of the nation’s oldest and most respected nonprofit medical honor societies and is focused on the role of physician-scientists in research, clinical care, and medical education.

Michael Cohen-Wolkowiez, is the Kiser-Arena Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics at Duke University School of Medicine and head of Pediatric Research at the Duke Clinical Research Institute. His research focuses on computational and patient-centric methods to advance and accelerate pediatric and adult drug development as well as strategic leadership of large, federally sponsored programs and networks.

Peter E. Fecci, is an associate professor of neurosurgery, pathology, and immunology at Duke University School of Medicine, where he also serves as director for the Duke Center for Brain and Spine Metastasis and the Brain Tumor Immunotherapy Program. Aa a neurosurgeon-scientist, he focuses on the design, optimization, and monitoring of immune-based treatment platforms for patients with intrinsic brain tumors, both primary and metastatic.

Mark A. Herman is an associate professor in the Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition Division of the Department of Medicine at Duke University School of Medicine and a member of the Duke Molecular Physiology Institute. He uses a multidisciplinary, systems approach to understand molecular mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome - a constellation of pathologies including obesity; insulin resistance; impaired glucose metabolism; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; and dyslipidemia, which can lead to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.