John Hunter Peel Alexander

John Hunter Peel Alexander
Professor of Medicine
Third Year Mentor - Clinical Research Study Program (CRSP)
Campus mail: 2400 Pratt St, Durham, NC 27705
Phone: (919) 668-8955

John H. Alexander, MD, MHS is a cardiologist and Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology at Duke University School of Medicine, as well as the Vice Chief, Clinical Research in the Division of Cardiology. He is the Director of Cardiovascular Research at the Duke Clinical Research Institute where he oversees a large group of clinical research faculty and a broad portfolio of cardiovascular clinical trials and observational clinical research programs. He is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation.

Dr. Alexander’s clinical interests are in acute and general cardiovascular disease, valvular heart disease, and echocardiology. His research is focused on the translation of novel therapeutic concepts into clinical data through clinical trials, specifically on the therapeutics of acute coronary syndromes, chronic coronary artery disease, and cardiac surgery and on novel methodological approaches to clinical trials. He was on the Executive Committee of the ARISTOTLE trial of apixaban in patients with atrial fibrillation and was the Principal Investigator of the APPRAISE-2 trial of apixaban in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

Dr. Alexander has published extensively and has served as the principal investigator of numerous multicenter clinical trials. He currently serves as the co-chair of the Clinical Trial Transformation Initiative (CTTI).

Education and Training

  • University of Pennsylvania, M.D. 1993
  • Children's Hospital Boston, Medical Resident, Medicine
  • Duke University, Fellow in Cardiology, Medicine

Publications

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of MC-1 in patients undergoing high-risk coronary artery bypass graft surgery: MC-1 to Eliminate Necrosis and Damage in Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is effective in relieving angina and improving survival and quality of life in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease; however, recurrent angina, myocardial infarction, neurological injury, an

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